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Please, stop saying you’re a sugar addict

by | Feb 18, 2020 | Quit Sugar

Most sugar detox programs tell you to say you’re a “sugar addict”, right?

I’m sure you’ve heard that before! They say that’s the first step to recovery.

And well, I agree with them. But also, I really don’t!

Let me explain.

First, I agree because to cure a problem, you first have to recognise you have one.

Or as A. Chapman beautifully put it, “You can’t escape from a prison if you don’t know you’re in one”.

Second, the word addiction is still, unfortunately, very stigmatised. Yet, it’s just a clinical term that describes the loss of control over the consumption of a substance. That’s all it is. Nothing fancy. But people still freak out when they hear it.

Therefore, admitting you have an addiction is crucial! Because it forces you to stop judging yourself and to stop judging others. It makes you more tolerant of your own vulnerabilities and of those of others.

And, isn’t owning your vulnerabilities like a queen the first step towards unconditional self-love and power? (It is.)

That being said, saying “I am a sugar addict” is very dangerous.

Here’s why.

Your sugar addiction is not your identity

Don’t give sugar more power than it already has

The problem when you say “I am a sugar addict” is that it becomes your identity.

And that’s so limiting! You are a multidimensional being, a puzzle made of a zillion pieces.

So, why chose one of the worst possible pieces to define yourself? 

I bet that sugar already takes a lot of space in your life. So don’t give it even more power and let it take over who you are.

Plus, there’s something extremely important you have to understand. 

You are not your sugar cravings.

Please. Stop for a second, and think about what I just said.

You’re not your sugar cravings! They don’t define you. 

Sugar cravings are just symptoms

When you have a wound that hurts, it’s because your body is telling you “Hey love! Your wound is infected, you gotta clean it”.

Well, that’s the exact same for big food cravings. They’re a way for your mind to tell you that it’s infected with subconscious traumas and blocages. And that you better do something about it.

We see sugar cravings as a pain in the ass, but they’re actually very useful. Without them, we’d have no way of knowing what’s going on in our subconscious.

I’ll make a blog post about that by the way don’t worry!

So, cravings are kind of like headaches: annoying, but temporary. They are a nuisance you’re experiencing right now, but sooner or later if you treat their cause, they’ll disappear. 

That’s as certain as 1+1=2.

Saying you’re a sugar addict makes it harder to kick the addiction

Saying you’re a sugar addict lowers your mental self-representation

So now you know, and hopefully agree, that you shouldn’t let your sugar addiction define you.

And well, you’re about to learn that saying you’re a sugar addict even makes it harder to kick the addiction!

When you say it too much, not only does it become your identity, it becomes your reality. 

Because the more you say it, the more your subconscious accepts it as an unshakable truth. And in turn it starts shaping your life, decisions and results accordingly.

You know how Law of Attraction books tell you to think about love and money to manifest them in your life?

Well, the exact same happens when you think about being a sugar addict. You’ll manifest more sugar cravings, you’ll be more obsessed with sweets, and you’ll get better at self-sabotage.

And look, it’s all very logical. Life and reality are all about perception. And perception comes from the subconscious. 

That’s why a pessimist sees a glass half empty and an optimist sees the same glass half full.

Saying you’re a sugar addict impacts your physiology

Ok, so now listen up. Not only saying you’re a sugar addict shapes your mental self-representation, but it also changes your physiology.

Isn’t that crazy?! 

The fact is that, empowering thoughts are extremely beneficial. They relax your muscles, improve your posture. The even sync your bodily functions such as your breath, heart rate and blood pressure!

That’s one of the reasons why being grateful is hella powerful in improving your life.

So as you can imagine, the opposite is true for limiting thoughts: they generate stress and turmoil in your body.

And well, that sucks for two big reasons:

  • When you cut out sugar from your diet, your body has a lot on its plate. All of a sudden, it has to remember how it functioned before the addiction. What its chemistry was like, how its endocrine system worked, etc. That’s a heavy task! And that’s why we experience withdrawal symptoms by the way. So, obviously, disrupting your physiology is the last thing you want.
  • Your overall state – basically how you feel – is the sum of your mental representations and your physiology. Here’s a quick math problem for you: if you lower both variables of an addition, what happens to the result? Yep, exactly! The result decreases. Hence, saying you’re a sugar addict lowers your overall state. And, that’s especially bad because the first step to breaking a sugar addiction is to raise your state from lack to abundance. From fear and despair, to power and faith.

So, what I invite you to do instead, is to say that “you have a temporary sugar addiction”. Or better yet, that you “currently have uncontrollable sugar cravings but you’re getting rid of them”.

In those formulations, you have the power.

Conclusion

We’ve covered quite a few interesting points in this blog post, haven’t we?

I feel like now is time to bullet point the hell out of them:

  • Recognizing you have a problem with sugar is super important. It’s the first step to doing something about it and to removing the stigma around it.
  • However, do not say that “you’re a sugar addict”. First, this turns mere symptoms (sugar cravings) into your whole identity. That’s so limiting! And that gives sugar more power than it should have.
  • Second, the more you say that, the more your subconscious mind anchors the idea that you’re a sugar addict. As a result, it will do everything it can to make your actions support that truth (hello binges and self-sabotage).
  • Third, not only do limiting thoughts lower your mental self-representation, but they also change your physiology for the worst. They create tension in your muscles and disrupt your bodily functions. 
  • Finally, all of that lowers your overall state. Which makes it almost impossible to overcome the addiction. 

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Who am I?

Glad you asked!

I was heavily addicted to sugar for years, had PTSD from living the 2015 Paris Attacks and lost my father to diabetes when I was 24.

Yet with close to no willpower, I managed to heal from all that, get my dream body and reach a level of inner piece that few people get to experience.
Since then, my mission has been to raise awareness and empower people around me. And based on my own experience and on formal training, I’ve developed a holistic system to help you reset your body and mind to finally lose weight.
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